Chester Racing Tips

Despite the Chester racecourse being among the oldest courses in England, it is still operational today. This racecourse is thriving. It is home to numerous notable racing events. It is located in Chester at the banks of River Dee, which gives it some incredible features.

Chester Horse Racing Tips

Find all today’s latest free horse racing tips including tips for Chester from the most respected professional tipsters from UK and Ireland.

Chester racecourse history

The history of Chester racing dates back to 1539. This was a time when King Henry VII was the king of England. The organizers launched some of its oldest festivals such as the May festival in 1776. In 1824, the management introduced the Tradesmen’s Cup. Today, it is referred to as the Chester Cup.

Although many races have taken place in this course ever since 1539, it has not always been smooth sailing. For instance, in the 1800s, England was marred with puritanism and civil wars. And due to this, the management had to cancel a handful of races. Flooding and strikes also interfered with races that were set to take place on these grounds.

In the 1760s, rumours circulated that the owners of the racecourse would build a state-of-the-art grandstand. Today, there are no doubts as the top weather grandstand was built.

The first ever-grand stand at Chester as described in the books of history was built in 1819. The public contributed money for the construction. Unfortunately, this stand was only for a few select wealthy racegoers.  In 1940, the owners of the course built the Dee stand. Middle racegoers welcomed this stand because it was quite affordable.

In the 1900s, the Chester racecourse was not yet successful. Besides facing criticism from the clergy who viewed horseracing as morally wrong, it also faced hostility from non-conformists. Poor management has also threatened the existence of this racecourse. Luckily, it survived all these trying times and it is now a fan favourite today.

The Course

Chester Flat Course

Sitting on a 90 acres’ piece of land, Chester is a massive racecourse. However, when compared to other racecourses, it has the shortest track. The course is about a mile long with a circular track. 

The Chester Racecourse is a flat race arena. And although it is not the easiest racecourse for horses and jockeys due to its sharp bends, racegoers relish the experience. Its nature also makes overtaking tremendously challenging. 

Chester main racing events

The Cheshire Oaks

The Cheshire Oaks is a hotly contested race that was introduced in 1950. It is one mile four furlongs and a few yards long. Winners take home the Robert Sangster Memorial Cup- which was named after a renowned breeder who brought some of the best horses to the race. 

The Chester Cup

The Chester Cup is a left-handed flat handicap race. This a race for horses aged four and above. It is about 2 miles, 2 furlongs, and 147 yards. Originally, this event was known as the Tradesmen cup. But in 1874, the organizers changed it to the Chester Traders cup.  Most people preferred to call it the Chester Cup. And in 1884, this became its title. 

Chester Vase

The Chester Vase is a race for 3 years old geldings and colts.  It falls in the Grade 3 flat race category and stretches for 1 mile, 4 furlongs, and 63 yards.

This racing event takes place in May each year at Chester. The race was first run in 1907. Back then, its rules allowed horses aged three and four to participate. And the race was only 1 mile, 4 furlongs, and 53 yards. The race has evolved over the years to be what it is today.

Dee Stakes

The Dee Stakes is another incredible horse race that takes place at the Chester Racecourse. It is a flat race for geldings and colts aged three years old. This race is 1 mile, 2 furlongs, and 70 yards long.

The organizers of this race named it after River Dee. At first, it was both colts and fillies. Today, the race also acts as a trial for the famous Epsom Derby.

Ormonde Stakes

The Ormonde Stakes ranks among the notable races on the Chester Racecourse. Thousands of people follow this race across the UK. It is only open for horses aged four years and above. It is 1 mile, 5 furlongs, and 84 yards long.

The organizers of this race named it after Ormonde, a famous racehorse. Originally, the race was just 5 furlongs long. Today, this race qualifies as a trial for the Coronation Cup.  St Nicholas Abbey was the last horse to win both races in 2011.

Huxley Stakes

The Huxley Stakes is a race for horses aged four and older. It is a Group 2 race that ran over 1 mile, 2 furlongs, and 70 yards. The organizers of this race named it after Huxley, a vibrant village situated in Chester. Horses that win this race get the Tradesman’s Cup.

Where to bet on Chester races

Online betting sites

The Chester races provide an opportunity for punters to make money. Most online sports betting companies feature Chester races in their markets. To bet on these races, you need to identify a reputable online betting provider. Ensure that they offer the Chester races markets that you are looking for, sign up, deposit funds, and start betting.

How to get to the Chester racing course

For those who like to watch the horse racing action from the stands, you can get to the Chester Racecourse by car, air, and train. 

By car, you can access these grounds through the M56, M6, M53, and A483. To navigate, use this postcode; Chester CH1 2LY. 

The Chester train station is a few minutes away from the racecourse. And some taxis can take you to the grounds and back to the station.

If you are flying to the racecourse, you need to call in advance and make your landing arrangements in advance.

If you follow the Chester races closely, you can develop a sound strategy and win regularly. Moreover, you do not have to go to the racecourse to place a bet. You can bet from the comfort of your house or through your mobile phone while on the go.